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THE FARTHERMOST VIEW

Selected Podpieces

MASS-PRODUCED MILKWEED

I stepped out of my office in downtown Orleans one day in September and headed out for a walk. I like having an office in town, and being able to stroll along the street staring into store windows, pretending I'm seeking inspiration for a brilliant essay or best-selling poem, and not having to stop every nine seconds for a short companion to sniff at a suspicious piece of grass or water an ornamental azalea. Read More 

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THE WINDSHIELD PHENOMENON

Driving is not the pleasure it used to be. Once you could pour down long stretches of highway at ninety miles an hour, with the occasional semi roaring past at maybe a hundred and ten. Then on the next hill the truck would be huffing and puffing in the far right lane, and you'd soar ahead, rounding some curve or peeling out on a straightaway past houses farms and fields. Read More 

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ONE WILD LIFE

There was a time when I could go to any garden center – yea, even unto a big box store – and wander through the aisles as if through a wonderland of vegetative possibility. The stunning colors, the surprising shapes of blossoms and leaves, everything was subject to my phytophilia. If it was in a pot and would grow in the ground, I brought it home and planted it.  Read More 
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WHY I'VE GONE NATIVE

Spicebush swallowtail baby.
Recently I read an article in Better Homes & Gardens that sets forth a number of terrific principles for natural-looking gardens. It emphasizes grouping both native and non-native plants with similar requirements to create a “natural” look in the garden; to grow the “right plant, right place” in order to effect waterwise, ecological gardening. Read More 
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NATIVE PLANTS

What makes a gardener fall in love with native plants? For me, the explanation’s simple: native animals. There’s nothing I like more than seeing a ruby-throated hummingbird hovering at the crossvine, grey squirrels collecting acorns or a praying mantis lurking in the clematis. And the more native plants you have, the more native animals will come to call. Read More 
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